Translocation, Exocytosis & Endocytosis

Once proteins are translated, they must be directed to the appropriate localization within, or outside of the cell. Protein translocation occurs either during translation or after translation and depends on the N'-terminal signal-recognition particle (SRP) interacting with its receptor.

Products
Background
Literature

Inhibitors

Cat No Product Name / Activity
6180 NMS 873
Potent and p97 ATPase (VCP) allosteric inhibitor

Other

Cat No Product Name / Activity
1231 Brefeldin A
Disrupts protein translocation to Golgi
2334 D15
Endocytosis blocker
4417 DBeQ
Selective and reversible p97 ATPase inhibitor
3922 Eeyarestatin I
Potent inhibitor of ER-associated protein degradation and translocation
1850 Exo1
Inhibits Golgi-ER traffic; blocks exocytosis
5172 FLI 06
Inhibitor of Notch signaling
3584 Golgicide A
Arrests secretion of soluble and membrane-associated proteins
1987 Leptomycin B
Inhibits nuclear export of proteins; antitumor
2839 Levetiracetam
Antiepileptic; binds SV2A
5153 ML 240
ATP-competitive inhibitor of p97 ATPase
4082 Anti-PIKFyve
Antibody recognizing PIKfyve
5978 WL 47 - dimer
High affinity caveolin-1 ligand

Once proteins are translated, they must be directed to the appropriate localization within, or outside of the cell.

Protein translocation occurs either during translation (co-translational translocation) or after translation (post-translational translocation) and depends on the N'-terminal signal-recognition particle (SRP). The SRP interacts with a SRP receptor on the ER and promotes transport of proteins into the ER lumen where they are prepared for secretion.

Exocytosis is a process by which proteins are released from a cell into the extracellular matrix. Newly synthesized proteins are incorporated into transport vesicles within the ER lumen, and these fuse with the cis-golgi. Cisternal migration progressively moves the transport vesicles towards the trans-golgi cisternae. Here, the vesicles move to and fuse with the plasma membrane, releasing the newly synthesized protein.

Endocytosis is the opposite process to exocytosis and involves internalization of proteins. In general, this process involves the formation of clathrin-coated pits on the plasma membrane, which then pinch off to become vesicles inside the cell. Sequentially, the vesicles fuse with early, then late, endosomes where the proteins are processed.

Literature for Translocation, Exocytosis & Endocytosis

Cancer

Cancer Research Product Guide

A collection of over 750 products for cancer research, the guide includes research tools for the study of:

  • Cancer Metabolism
  • Epigenetics in Cancer
  • Receptor Signaling
  • Cell Cycle and DNA Damage Repair
  • Angiogenesis
  • Invasion and Metastasis